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About Paris

Paris is the capital and most populous city of France, with an area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and a population of 2,206,488. Since the 17th century, Paris has been one of Europe's major centres of finance, commerce, fashion, science, and the arts.

The city is a major rail, highway, and air-transport hub served by two international airports: Paris-Charles de Gaulle (the second busiest airport in Europe after London Heathrow Airport with 69.5 million passengers in 2017) and Paris-Orly. Opened in 1900, the city's subway system, the Paris Métro, serves 5.23 million passengers daily,[8] and is the second busiest metro system in Europe after Moscow Metro. Paris's Gare du Nord is one of the ten busiest railway stations in the world, with 262 million passengers in 2015.

Here, we recommend some sightseeings to you, which is not the final arrangement on August 05, 2020.

The Colosseum or Roman Coliseum,originally the Flavian Amphitheatre (Latin:Amphitheatrum Flavium,Italian Anfiteatro Flavio or Colosseo),is an elliptical amphitheatre in the center of the city of Rome,Italy,the largest ever built in the Roman Empire.It is one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and Roman engineering.
Occupying a site just east of the Roman Forum,its construction started between 70 and 72 AD under the emperor Vespasian and was completed in 80 AD under Titus,with further modifications being made during Domitian's reign (81–96).The name "Amphitheatrum Flavium" derives from both Vespasian's and Titus's family name (Flavius,from the gens Flavia).
Capable of seating 50,000 spectators,the Colosseum was used for gladiatorial contests and public spectacles.As well as the gladiatorial games,other public spectacles were held there,such as mock sea battles,animal hunts,executions,re-enactments of famous battles,and dramas based on Classical mythology.The building ceased to be used for entertainment in the early medieval era.It was later reused for such purposes as housing,workshops,quarters for a religious order,a fortress,a quarry,and a Christian shrine.


The Vatican is the smallest independent state in the world, with an area of less than half a square kilometer, most of it enclosed by the Vatican walls. Inside are the Vatican palace and gardens, St. Peter's Basilica, and St. Peter's Square, an area ruled by the Pope, supreme head of the Roman Catholic Church. This compact space offers much for tourists to see, between its museums and the great basilica itself.

Inside St. Peter's Basilica is Michelangelo's masterpiece, Pieta, along with statuary and altars by Bernini and others. The unquestioned highlight of the Vatican museums is the Sistine Chapel, whose magnificent frescoed ceiling is Michelangelo's most famous work. Inside the Vatican Palace are the Raphael Rooms, the Borgia Apartments, the Vatican Library, and a number of museums that include the Picture Gallery, Museum of Secular Art, Etruscan Museum, and others. The collections you can see in these cover everything from papal coaches to 20th-century art reflecting religious themes.



 
The Spanish Steps, the flight of irregular stairs and landings that lead up to the French church of Trinità dei Monti. The stairs take their name from Piazza di Spagna, the plaza at their base and one of Rome's most typical squares. The stairs have been a favorite haunt of tourists, where they can sit and enjoy a gelato in the summer or warm their hands around cones of hot roasted chestnuts in the winter. The boat-shaped fountain at the foot of the Spanish Steps is known as the Barcaccia and was created by Pietro Bernini, father of the great Baroque architect Gian Lorenzo Bernini. Via Condotti, leading southwest from Piazza di Spagna, is Rome's most fashionable shopping street, where the Caffè Greco is famous for the artists, writers, and musicians who have frequented it.

 

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